Piano Training Camp (Part 1 of 3)

Camps and Workshops, Group Lessons

Who says music isn’t a sport? Brushing up on their theory skills students participated in the Piano Training Camp this summer.

Joy over at ColorInMyPiano compiled a great list of fun games and activities from other blogs including her own for a camp like this. I used quite a few. Because I’m in AZ, I was limited to how many games we could really get away with doing outside before it became unbearable. So some of the games I adapted to be inside activities instead. And some games I just adapted to fit my needs a little better. I also used several of Susan Paradis games and some other games and apps that I have tried in my studio before or recently found.

I thought I would share the games and activities we did. I separated this into a 3 part post…

Making Team Flags that will be displayed on the wall in the studio music lab room for 2013-2014.

 

 

 

PART 1: RHYTHM

 

What Note Am I? 

Similar to the “headband” game. I found these foam hats over at Michaels 50% off making them only .50 each. Saved me some time in making some headbands and they worked great. Students can ask 3 yes/no questions in order to guess what rhythm or note value they had on their head. Version 1 was with note/rest values. Version 2 was 4 beat measures students clapped and the student who’s rhythm was on their head had to listen and figure out the 4 beat measure they had.

  

 

 

Rhythm Value Relay

Students were given a note value and had to relay race with that value in mind. For example if they were to get a whole note- that is 4 beats. (Jump rope 4 times, bounce ball 4 times, go through hula hoop 4 times, find the whole note and come back with your partner in 2 legged race style, give correct rhythm card to teacher.)

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Edge- A board game where students are covering up the rocks on their board according to the rhythm value in hopes of not going over the edge before the flashcards run out!

 

 

Water Rhythm Relay- Given a rhythm, students race to fill up that many sponges and ring them out in the bucket on the other side. The team with the most water in the bucket at the end wins!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhythm Bean Bag Toss- Trying to toss a beanbag and make it in the cans. Larger the note value- more points!

  

 

 

 

 

Cup Song– The movie, “Pitch Perfect” made the cup song activity very popular. This was a fun rhythm activity to do at camp!

 

Rhythm Band– Younger students always enjoy making a rhythm band!

 

8 Comments

  1. Marian

    Looks like you all had a great time!! Fabulous – thanks for sharing!
    Great teacher!!!

    Reply
  2. Angela

    Fun! I’m definitely stealing these ideas!

    Reply
    • foxxpianostudio

      A lot more to come Angela! Keep your eye out for Part 2 and 3! 😉

      Reply
  3. Joy

    So fun! I enjoyed seeing all your photos and games!

    Reply
    • foxxpianostudio

      Thanks Joy and especially thanks for putting together that musical olympics camp game and activity list. It was very helpful for me and gave me some more games/activities that we could do.

      Reply
  4. Heather

    Your post is fantastic! Thank you! I may have a unique issue (or maybe not), that I am hoping you can help with. I teach Music (6 months – 6 yrs) at a Private School (6 months – 14 yrs), part of my job is teaching Music Theory. I absolutely love teaching Theory as much as my kiddos love it! Running an after school, type program anytime would be my dream! However, there lies my issue! I would have no control over who signs up, my fear is that I would end up with a group of interested participants with varying degrees of previous and some with no experience.

    How do you manage such groups?
    Is it even possible to run a camp/after-school program with so many levels in the same group?

    Thank you in advance,

    Heather

    Reply
    • foxxpianostudio

      Heather, in your situation I would to a camp mainly based on rhythm activities. Drum circles, using boomwhackers, making a homemade instrument, etc… If you have an iPad you can implement Piano Maestro in the program because that would work well for all ages (I would say 3 and up though…). Hope that helps!

      Reply

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